Typhoon Karen 1962

Page Updated 08/03/13
Photo's by Roger Atchley '62-'64 TE-1.. Unless noted otherwise
[ Main Index ] [ Home ] [ JTWC Report ]
[ CROSSROADS Issue of Typhoon Karen ] [ ALL HANDS article of Typhoon Karen ]
 
Click on picture to see larger version, Use Back Button to return

Comment

 
t-karen1_tn.jpg A VW-1 aircraft radar camera picture of the infamous, Typhoon Karen. The camera scope has been set to the 250 NM range, 50 mile range markers are barely visible on the expanded picture.
The information that can be readily seen in this photo taken on 8 November at 1135 Zulu time (9:35 PM local time) show that TE-5 (145931) was heading almost due North about 120 nautical miles East and slightly South of the eye. At this time the Typoon was only about 1 day old and about 100 miles North of the island of Truk (see typhoon tracking map below).
Photo Courtesy Roger Atchley 62 - 64 TE-1.
 
t-karen_tn.jpg Another VW-1 aircraft radar camera picture of Typhoon Karen.
The information that can be readily seen in this photo taken on 8 November at 1405 Zulu time (12:05 AM local time) show that TE-5 (145931) was heading slightly north of east about 150 nautical miles south of the eye. At this time the Typoon was about 2½ hours older then the previous picture.
Photo Courtesy Roger Atchley 62 - 64 TE-1.
 
TE_1_tn.jpg FWC/JTWC track of Typhoon Karen. She is a legend among all VW-1 members on Guam during 11 November 1962. Winds were at 212 m.p.h. when she struck the island.
Map & typhoon track: Courtesy Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) web site
 
TE_1_tn.jpg FWC/JTWC barograph chart of Typhoon Karen as she passed over the island of Guam, during 11 November 1962. Winds were at 212 m.p.h. when she struck the island.

FWC/JTWC 2215 (10:15 PM) duty officer log book entry of 11 November 1962: Eye passage to south apparent by low point reached on Microbarograph, wind shift to east, and speed increase. Pressure 934+ mb. Entire watch section secured inside vault due to severe "pumping" (ears "popping" every 18 seconds) action of 5mb and extreme bowing of bulkheads and overheads. Water damage becoming extreme. Three inches of water over lower deck and water pouring through over-head.
Barograph chart recording: Courtesy Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) web site
 
typhoon1_tn.jpg The picture is in fact Typhoon Karen that I took with a hand held Petri 7 camera from the radar position IP203/APS-20 scope. It is a time exposure. I slewed the origin of the sweep just off the scope and when the sweep came on the scope I opened the shutter and closed it when the sweep left the scope at the bottom. Crew 2 on TE-2 flew out of Sangley Point on the night that Karen hit Guam and made one fix and returned to Sangley. We were about 90 nmi out of Guam when the picture was taken. The front-end crew was able to raise NAS Ground Control who reported winds of 100 knots at that time. It was obvious from the radar picture that the worst was yet to come. The southern end of Guam is clearly visible just outside of the biggest feeder band and the Island of Rota is clearly visible to the north (up). After I got these pictures developed I made copies for anyone that wanted one.

Photo taken by C. Lyle Fisher AT2 61-63 TE-2; ATCS USN Retired


Photo sent Courtesy Roger Atchley 62 - 64 TE-1.
 
Sign at main gate of NAS Agana Picture is of a flattened elephant Quonset hut by Typhoon Karen Typhoon Karen damage in MATS terminal area of NAS Agana Guam
It was three days after Karen before Crew 2 was allowed to return home. I believe that I took all of those pictures within two or three days after returning, so the pictures would have been taken five to seven days after the storm.

The picture on the left is at the main gate of NAS Agana, the sign was a metal sign that was set in concrete.

The middle picture is of a flattened elephant Quonset hut on the air station, I do not remember what purpose this one served. One of these huts, which was across the street from the VW-1 AE shop, was used by NSD to keep aircraft related stores items. It was generally known as "aux stores", it suffered a similar fate to the hut pictured.

The 3rd picture is of the MATS terminal area, the Navy Exchange was also in this area.

Photos courtesy Lyle Fisher VW-1 1961 - 1963.
 
Typhoon Karen damage in Agana Guam Asan & storm surge damage. Asan & storm surge damage. Marine Drive in Agana - note boats deposited by Typhoon Karen
These pictures were taken about five to seven days after Typhoon Karen.

First picture on the left is of storm damage in Agana.
Second & third pictures is at Asan & storm surge damage.
The fourth picture is on Marine Drive in Agana - note boats deposited by storm surge.

For Lyle Fisher's personal account of Typhoon Karen while with TE-2 Click here

Photos courtesy Lyle Fisher VW-1 1961 - 1963.
 
wiggs-KAREN6_r1 wiggs-KAREN8_r1 wiggs-KAREN9_r1 wiggs-KAREN10_r1
These pictures were taken several days after Typhoon Karen.

Roy Wiggs was attached to NAS Agana during Typhoon Karen. He was assigned to NAS AIMD from March 1961 to April 1963, he also flew as a radioman on the R5Ds and the UFs,

Pictures courtesy of Roy Wiggs AT-1 VW-1 70-71...
wiggs-KAREN11_r1 wiggs-KAREN13_r1 wiggs-Work-Stand-After-Karen_r1 wiggs-Work-Stand-After-Karen1_r1
These pictures were taken several days after Typhoon Karen.

Roy Wiggs was attached to NAS Agana during Typhoon Karen. He was assigned to NAS AIMD from March 1961 to April 1963, he also flew as a radioman on the R5Ds and the UFs,

Pictures courtesy of Roy Wiggs AT-1 VW-1 70-71...
 
Valid XHTML 1.0 Transitional